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Clear Floor Area for Wheeled Mobility when Reaching or Grasping

Clear Floor Area for Wheeled Mobility when Reaching or Grasping
Clive D’Souza, Edward Steinfeld, Victor Paquet, Jonathan White
IDEA Center, University at Buffalo

 

Abstract: The clear floor area for wheeled mobility represents the minimum floor area required by users of wheeled mobility devices to access elements in the built environment. This area is typically depicted as a rectangular space the dimensions of which are based on static measurements of occupied length and occupied breadth of wheeled mobility devices (i.e., with the occupant seated in their own wheeled mobility device). However, for tasks that involve reaching or grasping to adjacent design elements such as sink faucets, door handles, or when using automated teller machines, information kiosks, additional floor space should be provided to allow for flexibility of use by accommodating users that are right or left hand dominant, as well as their preferred reach direction i.e., forward, sideways, or an intermediate reach direction. For instance, anthropometry research on wheeled mobility users found that about 26% (55 of the 213) men and 28% (43 out of 156) women were left-handed, which is much higher than would be expected in the general population.

 

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References

Accessibility Standards Documents

Australian Standard, 2001. AS1428.1-2001 Design for access and mobility-Part 1: general requirements for access-new building work. Sydney, Australia: Standards Australia International.

Australian Standard, 1992. AS1428.2-1992 Design for access and mobility-Part 2: enhanced and additional requirements-buildings and facilities. Sydney, Australia: Standards Australia International.

British Standards Institution, 2001. BS8300:2001 Design of buildings and their approaches to meet the needs of disabled people-Code of practice. London, U.K.: BSI.

Canadian Standards Association, 2004. CAN/CSA B651-04 accessible design for the built environment standard. Mississauga, Ontario, Canada: Canadian Standards Association.

International Code Council/American National Standards Institute, 2003. ICC/ANSI A117.1-2003, Accessible and usable buildings and facilities. International Code Council, New York.

U.S. Access Board, 2004. Americans with Disabilities Act and Architectural Barriers Act Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities. Washington, DC: U.S. Access Board. Retrieved February 17, 2010, from http://access-board.gov/ada-aba/index.htm.

 

Relevant IDEA Center Publications

D'Souza, C., Steinfeld, E., Paquet, V., Feathers, D., 2010. Space requirements for wheeled mobility devices in public transportation: An analysis of clear floor space requirements. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, In press.

Steinfeld, E., Maisel, J., Feathers, D., D'Souza, C., 2010. Standards and anthropometry for wheeled mobility. Buffalo: NY: IDEA Center.

Steinfeld, E., D'Souza, C., Maisel, J., 2010. Clear Floor Space For Contemporary Wheeled Mobility Users. In Proceedings of 12th International Conference on Mobility and Transport for Elderly and Disabled Persons (TRANSED 2010), Hong Kong.

Steinfeld, E., D'Souza, C., Paquet, V., White, J., 2010. Clear floor area for wheeled mobility users. In Proceedings of 3rd International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, 2010 AHFE International, Miami, Florida, Taylor and Francis, Ltd.

Steinfeld, E., Paquet, V., Feathers, D., 2004. Space requirements for wheeled mobility devices. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 48th Annual Meeting.

 

Relevant Design Resource Articles

DR #15: Clear Floor Area for Wheeled Mobility

DR #17: Knee and toe clearances for wheeled mobility users

DR #18: Pinch grip forces for wheeled mobility users

DR #19: Power grip forces for wheeled mobility users

DR #20: Functional reach capability for wheeled mobility users